About

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Mary ElizaBeth Peters 

is an author, theatre artist and educator in Boston, Massachusetts. Her current writing project, a non-fiction health and wellness book, aims to give practical advice, alongside heartfelt storytelling, to patients and caregivers living with chronic illness. Beth has been living with Cystic Fibrosis for 40 years and received life-saving double lung transplantation surgery in 2010. She also lives with endometrios and diabetes. Going through these medical challenges, while living the life she chooses as a professional woman, has brought life lessons that she wants to share.

Beth is an inclusion-based drama teacher for the Boston Public Schools, where she teaches drama to K0-5th grade students, including students with Autism and multiple disabilities. Her work centers on social emotional learning and wellness, and includes a focus on trauma-sensitive teaching and bullying intervention.

 

Beth is also a playwright and director, and holds a Masters Degree in Theatre Education from Emerson College and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Performance Studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  Beth has worked with Boston Actors Theatre, Commonwealth Shakespeare Company, New Repertory Theatre, Watertown High School, the Boston Health Commission, The Learning Center for Deaf Children, and the Perkins School for the Blind, among other organizations.

 

Professional affiliations and conference presentations include the American Alliance for Theatre Education, the Massachusetts Educational Theatre Guild, the Emerson College Theatre Festival, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Cystic Fibrosis Research Institute.

 

Her play, “Jonathan” will open with Moonbox Productions at the Boston Center for the Arts this year. “Jonathan” is about a young man living with autism who is working at a big-box store during the busy holiday season. This play asks audiences to consider their beliefs about disability, employment, education, and to take a real look at how we treat each other.